Susan McGalla: How to Succeed as a Woman in the Workplace

Susan McGalla has just shared some important advice for woman in the workplace, and it’s worth paying attention to (originally reported on PR Newswire).

 

The original article starts out with some history, giving context to why McGalla’s advice is prescient to the modern reader. A century ago most women worked in the home, making up less than a quarter of the workforce. Today almost half of workers are women. That’s great progress!

 

Unfortunately women are still being discriminated against, with less than half of female workers in America holding jobs as executive officers. This indicates, and Susan McGalla reiterates, that many women have a hard time advancing in the workplace.

 

Why should we listen to McGalla’s advice?

 

Because she’s already proven herself in the business world and works to help other get ahead. She speaks professionally about how women can break through and get ahead in the business world.

 

So what is her advice?

 

First, McGalla advises getting a good education. Despite tuition costs going through the roof, she still advises getting a quality education to develop the skill set necessary to succeed in a primarily male workforce. The important thing, she stresses, is having a solid plan, which includes planning how to get money for college. There are lots of scholarships and other aid available to women who do their homework.

 

Her next piece of advice is to be confident. It’s easy to see why this would be difficult when trying to get ahead as the underdog in a field dominated by men. McGalla shares how management’s negative influence can reduce women’s ambitions. She recommends fighting this by finding and building your own support network to keep you motivated to push forward with bold career choices.

 

Her last piece of advice is to ignore the whole idea that it’s harder for women to succeed in the workforce, and instead just work hard. This prevents you from having an attitude or feeling that you deserve certain privileges, which can have a negative influence on how hard you actually work.

 

She ends with a great piece of advice: “Let your work speak for itself.”

Find out more about Susan McGalla:

http://www.post-gazette.com/business/top50/2006/03/21/Susan-P-McGalla/stories/200603210294